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Stators for generating power?
Last Post 29 May 2012 10:54 AM by jwd217. 1 Replies.
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biomedsteel
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Posts:1

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25 May 2012 06:46 AM
    If I had two stators both same amps and size say 15 amps 120v, and I connected both rotors together with a belt. If I put 120v Ac to one of the stators, and it turns the other stator how much power would you get back from the other stator? I know there is lose, but how would I find out how much lose. If it was a hundred percent efficient would you get the same power back out? Is the power that is generated by a stator the same as the power that it takes to run it? I would like to take a bike and build a stator in both hubs of the front and rear wheel. My idea is to have two sets of batteries. I want to put a switch where I can run both stators at once or just run one and have the other recharging the battery pack that is not in use. I know it will have significant loss. I wanted to build a set up where I can test out a couple different configurations. I’m having trouble calculating the loss of what I’m putting into the stators vs what I can recover from the stator that will not be running. Nothing is free energy, but I was hoping that this set up could prolong the range of my battery packs. Kind of like top speed uses both stators and low speed uses one with the other generating power.
    jwd217
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    Posts:31

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    29 May 2012 10:54 AM
    There is not enough information to know what the loss would be. The stator itself is not 100% efficent but ther is also bearing loss and if they are turning cooling fans loss from moving air. However, your basic plan here is flawed. For example if the loss were 10%. If the generator was producing 100 watts it would need 110 watts to turn it. So the motor would be sucking 110 watts out of the battery, just to put 100 watts back. This would be in addition to what the motor needed to move the bike. So no matter how much power the generator could produce it would need 10% more to do that. You could still use two motors to run the bike, one when low power is needed and two when high power is needed. You could also use them to recharge the battery when braking, which is what hybrid cars do.
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