Electronics Weekly – Analog Devices Wideband Microwave Drive, Microchip Wireless Sensor Nodes & More
Vincent Charbonneau posted on March 08, 2019 |

Analog Devices Wideband Microwave Up and Downconverter Drives

ADMV1013 and ADMV1014 microwave drives. (Image courtesy of Analog Devices.)
ADMV1013 and ADMV1014 microwave drives. (Image courtesy of Analog Devices.)

Analog Devices announced its ADMV1013 and ADMV1014, a paired microwave upconverter and downconverter, respectively. These ICs operate over a wide frequency range with 50Ω-match from 24GHz up to 44GHz, facilitating ease of design and reducing the cost of building a single platform that can cover all 5GmmWave frequency bands including 28GHz and 39GHz.

For more information, visit Analog Devices’ website.

Cypress Processing System for IoT Design

PSoC 64 MCU. (Image courtesy of Cypress Semiconductor.)
PSoC 64 MCU. (Image courtesy of Cypress Semiconductor.)

Cypress Semiconductor has developed PSoC 64 Secure Microcontrollers(MCUs), which integrate standards-based system layer security software with the hardware layer features available in the PSoC 6 architecture. Specifically, PSoC 64 Secure MCU devices provide an isolated root-of-trust with true attestation and provisioning services. In addition, the line includes devices that deliver a pre-configured secure execution environment supporting the system software of various Internet of Things (IoT platforms, providing TLS authentication, secure storage and firmware management.

For more information, visit Cypress’ website.

Microchip Wireless Sensor Nodes

SAM R30 module. (Image courtesy of Microchip.)
SAM R30 module. (Image courtesy of Microchip.)

Microchip unveiled its SAM R30, an IEEE 802.15.4-compliant module that combines a low-power MCU with a sub-GHz radio, accelerating time to market and providing long-lasting battery life in wireless-networked sensors.

The SAM R30 module supports proprietary networks that can be readily customized and configured. This is useful for applications in which interoperability is not desired due to their inherent vulnerability to remote attacks, such as alarm systems, building automation, smart cities and industrial sensor networks. An advantage of an IEEE 802.15.4-based network is that member devices can sleep for extended periods of time and remain part of the network.

For more information, visit Microchip’s website.

RS Components PICASO-based LCD Modules

Gen4 Series of TFT LCD modules. (Image courtesy of RS Components.)
Gen4 Series of TFT LCD modules. (Image courtesy of RS Components.)

RS Components launched the Gen4 Series of TFT LCD modules and related starter packs from 4D Systems. Gen4 Series LCD modules are powered by either a DIABLO16 or a PICASOGPU, both manufactured by 4D Systems, and incorporate improved graphics functionality. The displays come in a number of sizes, from 2.4 inches (240 x 320 pixels) up to 7.0 inches (800 x 480 pixels). Resistive and capacitive touch screen options are available, as well as non-touch-sensitive versions.

For more information, visit RS Components’ website.

TI BAW Resonator

BAW resonator. (Image courtesy of Texas Instruments.)
BAW resonator. (Image courtesy of Texas Instruments.)

Texas Instruments (TI) introduced bulk acoustic wave (BAW)-based embedded processing and analog chips for connectivity and communications infrastructure. The first two devices developed with TI BAW technology, the SimpleLink CC2652RB wireless MCU and LMK05318 network synchronizer clock, can help system designers streamline design logistics, which in turn allows for potential overall development and system cost savings.

For more information, visit TI’s website.

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