Going Mobile — Which Tablets Could Work for Engineers?
Sanjeev Pal posted on December 01, 2015 |
The ability to access and modify information quickly anytime and anywhere has led to the use of mobile devices on the manufacturing shop floor, in warehouses, in the field—even in-flight.

Microsoft Surface Pro 4 Microsoft Surface Pro 4
Design firms are slowly moving toward mobile design tools, although this transition is not as fast as the transitions in other manufacturing industries. While computing power is no longer an issue with mobile devices, the ability to view and design on a small screen will always hinder detailed design tasks. However, the improvements that are being made continue to entice design firms as well as professionals and encourage them to transition to these devices. Large-enterprise design departments may never convert their desktop or tower workstations fully to mobile workstations. Many designers and engineers who work with large assemblies and massive amounts of data, constantly rendering or running simulations, will cling to their machines. However, improvements in CPU and graphics performance have led several designers to consider high-performance laptops or mobile workstations, inspiring many—especially those who need to work in more than one location—to abandon their desk-bound computers. More and more power is coming in yet smaller and lighter devices. Even the latest, thinnest laptop, such as the Lenovo ThinkPad X1, can look like a monster compared to the company’s recently introduced tablet/keyboard combo, the Yoga P40. The power and portability of some of these new devices are leading many engineers to question the need for super power in a box that stays in one place or their laptop — which suddenly looks large and feels heavy. Maybe a super tablet or convertible would be good enough most of the time? In this article, we examine a few of the very mobile computers that are available now — or will be soon.

 

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