Bugatti 3D Prints Classic Car for Kids
Michael Molitch-Hou posted on March 13, 2019 |

French sports car manufacturer Bugatti first made its mark on the world with the Bugatti Type 35 race car (“the Bugatti Baby”) in the early 20th century. While the Bugatti family may have passed on and its name may now belong to the Volkswagen Group, the Bugatti Type 35 has been reborn as the Bugatti Baby II.

The Bugatti Baby II, for rich kids who want to go fast. (Image courtesy of Bugatti.)
The Bugatti Baby II, for rich kids who want to go fast. (Image courtesy of Bugatti.)

At €30,000 a pop, the Bugatti Baby II is a limited-run electric vehicle for kids of an advantaged socioeconomic status. When actually manufactured, the vehicle will be three-quarters of the size of the original Bugatti Baby and will include a 3D-printed frame. Other features include a rear-wheel-drive powertrain that runs off of removable lithium-ion batteries. The vehicle will top out at 12 mph in “child mode” and 28 mph in “adult mode.” An optional “Speed Key” will allow users to disengage the speed limiter and access all 10kW of the vehicle’s battery.

A 3D-printed brake caliper that is thought to be featured in Bugatti’s latest luxury vehicle, the $12.5M La Voiture Noire. (Image courtesy of Bugatti.)
A 3D-printed brake caliper that is thought to be featured in Bugatti’s latest luxury vehicle, the $12.5M La Voiture Noire. (Image courtesy of Bugatti.)

Though the kid car pays tribute to Bugatti’s legacy, the 3D-printed frame recalls more recent developments within the business. Bugatti has already been working with metal 3D printing company SLM Solutions since 2014, using the technology to 3D print a brake caliper that is said to be the largest functional part 3Dprinted in titanium.

Other parts printed by Bugatti and SLM Solutions include an active spoiler bracket, motor bracket and an axel differential housing part. The use of 3D printing allowed the spoiler bracket to be more lightweight, thus increasing the speed and performance of the vehicle on which it was attached. More interesting was the motor bracket, which incorporated cooling channels that reduced the temperature ofthe Bugatti Chiron supercar.

3D-printed motor bracket with integrated cooling channels. (Image courtesy of Bugatti.)
3D-printed motor bracket with integrated cooling channels. (Image courtesy of Bugatti.)

The Bugatti Baby II won’t be quite as powerful as the brand’s supercars, but it will have plenty of drive for your average spoiled brat. Only 500 of these racecar replicas will be reproduced. If you happen to be able to afford one, visit the Bugatti Baby website to reserve your slot.


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