Mastering Engineering Equations Made Easy
Meghan Brown posted on August 29, 2017 | 1876 views
Jeffrey Alperovich, a graduate student in Purdue’s School of Mechanical Engineering, has created ME2Go, a mechanical engineering pocket reference, to help students easily access specific information. The app demonstrates common formulas and their derivations, so students can understand how and why the formula is used. (Image courtesy of Shannon Kane/Purdue Research Foundation Image.)

Jeffrey Alperovich, a graduate student in Purdue’s School of Mechanical Engineering, has created ME2Go, a mechanical engineering pocket reference, to help students easily access specific information. The app demonstrates common formulas and their derivations, so students can understand how and why the formula is used. (Image courtesy of Shannon Kane/Purdue Research Foundation Image.)

Engineering students are expected to master a huge array of equations, formulas and derivations over the course of their degree. When in the midst of trying to learn and understand all of these equations, students are often looking for study aids to help them.

Adding his own efforts to the task of finding a better way to learn formulas, a graduate engineering student at Purdue University named Jeffrey Alperovich is developing an app designed to help mechanical engineering students learn and study more effectively with just the touch of a screen.

ME2Go is designed to be an easily accessible and widely informative pocket reference tool in the form of a smartphone app. He believes his app will become an integral aspect of students’ educational experience, and founded his own company, Rooski Innovations, in order to commercialize it.

“I started this company as a way to solve my own problems,” Alperovich said. “I saw students needed more accessible references at hand, and I wanted to fix it for myself. I realized that if I built a company around the app, I could jump-start a solution for other students needing the same kind of help.”

ME2Go currently covers formulas and equations for 13 different mechanical engineering subjects, including thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, design, statistics and linear circuits. Alperovich is actively updating the app with new information, formulas and derivations from various subjects for students to easily reference.

(Image courtesy of Rooski Innovations.)
Screenshots of the ME2Go app. (Image courtesy of Rooski Innovations.)

“The app is ever-developing as I continuously add more information and subjects to its portfolio,” he said. “I hope students will use this pocket reference in class or at internships in place of carrying or shuffling through copious stacks of notes. My goal is to allow students to easily look up a quick formula or information, wherever they are, to save time and effort.”

Alperovich said he designed the app to demonstrate the complete solution of formulas.

“My app is more useful to teach students how to derive an equation step-by-step based off the example in the app rather than just seeing the end result like the available alternatives,” he said. “This pocket reference has more in-depth explanations and derivations, rather than just the final equations. I believe it will allow students to more easily understand the work they’re doing.”

At the present time, the ME2Go app predominantly covers undergraduate concepts; however, Alperovich hopes to expand into graduate-level concepts. Eventually, he wants professors at both the undergraduate and graduate levels to use the pocket reference as a teaching aid for students in their classes.

“Taking a step further, my goal is to work with some university professors, at and outside of Purdue, who can use this as a course tool,” he said. “Professors can direct students’ questions back to the app’s information. I would develop a way to relate a professors’ in-depth coursework to the app so it would benefit everyone. As the company grows, the app will become a reference and teaching tool that professors can use as a new technology platform.”

Alperovich plans to build the app to reach beyond his own expertise.

“Right now, my scope is focused on mechanical engineering because that’s where I’m comfortable. I have already started incorporating some graduate-level material,” he said. “I can see the app spreading to other disciplines as I start to build up my resources. My first steps will be toward engineering disciplines, then opening up to other fields.”

Alperovich received assistance from the Purdue Foundry, an entrepreneurship and commercialization accelerator that helps Purdue students to bring their ideas and innovations from design to market.  This type of start-up incubator is becoming popular across many universities as a way to invest in students and help them share their work with the world.

“Not only did I receive a great education from Purdue, but I also took advantage of the startup program offered at the Purdue Foundry,” Alperovich said. “The program helped me realize many valuable insights and perspectives on different approaches to entrepreneurship and starting a company. The Foundry was also incredibly helpful in broadening my network and networking with those in the industry to gain feedback.”

To learn more about engineering at Purdue University, visit their website.

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