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Oil Flow Rate
Last Post 27 Mar 2013 05:03 PM by Noushka. 4 Replies.
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Noushka
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Posts:3

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16 Mar 2013 01:42 AM
    Hi,

    Would anyone have an idea how I could estimate the flow rate of Heavy Fuel Oil at the bottom of a pierced tank?

    Viscosity: 380 cst at 32 degrees Celsius

    I know that
    Q=VA and V=(2.g.h)^0.5

    But that doesnt account for viscosity...

    Thanks.
    Niel
    Basic Member
    Basic Member
    Posts:193

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    17 Mar 2013 03:23 AM
    Have you applied Stokes Flow equations across the interface?

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stokes_Flow

    Niel Leon
    engineering.com
    Noushka
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    Posts:3

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    17 Mar 2013 05:48 PM
    Thanks for the reply Niel.

    I dont know much about creeping flow theory, but I guess the precise way to solve this problem, would be to do a complete CFD analysis.

    I was just wondering if there was a simple hand calculation check I could use to get an idea of the flow rate out of the hole.

    I already know the depth and size of the hole in the tank, but I have no idea how to account for the fact that the oil here is very thick / viscous.

    Niel
    Basic Member
    Basic Member
    Posts:193

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    19 Mar 2013 02:37 AM
    If you know the dynamic viscosity of the fluid you can apply it to the Stokes equiation and that should provide you with the answer.

    Niel
    Noushka
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    Posts:3

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    27 Mar 2013 05:03 PM
    Yeah I now the dynamic viscosity, but it doesnt seem to be quite straightforward to simply use the stroke equations for a practical example like this.

    I can calculate the pressure gradient, but how could I know the second derivative of speed , and the applied body force f?

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