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Not mechanically inclined but wants to study engineering
Last Post 12 Apr 2012 05:14 AM by Gabriella17. 11 Replies.
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Gabriella17
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20 Feb 2012 06:43 AM
    Let's say a high school student gets A's in math and science. They want to pursue a degree in engineering but they aren't mechanically inclined. Would it be ill advised to pursue a degree in something like mechanical or civil engineering? What about other branches of engineering?

    What type of interests should you have for each type of engineering?
    Niel
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    20 Feb 2012 02:40 PM
    Gabriella:

    You might be surprised how many mechanical engineers are not mechanically inclined or do not consider themselves to be particularly mechanically inclined. Part of this issue has to do with exposure to mechanical systems, "Learning how to use a wrench." Get yourself involved in program like FIRST Robotics or other programs where you can actually practice and get exposed to mechanical systems.

    As for other fields or engineering disciplines you could consider Materials Engineering, Computer Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Bio-medical Engineering, etc.

    Niel Leon
    engineering.com
    Gabriella17
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    21 Feb 2012 04:23 AM
    What sorts of interests should one have to pursue engineering?
    rileymorris
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    21 Feb 2012 09:45 AM
    First of all, you should enjoy math, physics and in most cases chemistry. It is also important that you like to be creative, enjoy challenges, and don't mind working hard.
    Gabriella17
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    22 Feb 2012 12:45 PM

    Posted By rileymorris on 21 Feb 2012 02:45 PM
    First of all, you should enjoy math, physics and in most cases chemistry. It is also important that you like to be creative, enjoy challenges, and don't mind working hard.


    I do enjoy math, especially algebra; not a fan geometry. I haven't taken physics yet, but I read books about it, and I like it. I don't know if I'm creative. I always think I don't have much of an imagination.
    I'm interested in the field because I wanted to go into architecture, but architecture is mostly dying.

    I'm worried about getting into engineering school because I don't have much experience building or designing anything.

    Thank you guys for your responses.
    Gring
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    23 Feb 2012 02:44 PM
    I certainly am biased, but I would suggest you look into BioEngineering (BioMedical Engineering). At my university we are required to take the introductory course for Civil, Electrical, Chemical and Bio-engineering which makes it very easy to switch majors after you've had a chance to see which is the best fit.
    Within our own curriculum we are exposed to many different engineering paths as well, from designing drug delivery systems to chair ergonomics to ECG circuits to designing bio-compatible materials. I hope you find the major that is right for you!
    Gabriella17
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    24 Feb 2012 02:31 PM
    That's my predicament: trying to figure out which engineering field would be right for me, if any.
    Yomero
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    24 Feb 2012 08:06 PM
    Gring is right, you need exposure to the different kinds of engineering areas before you can make up your mind.
    However, I can add that people inclined towards engineering are in general tinkerers. Do you usually find yourself wondering how something works? How a particular thing or appliance, or system really works?
    For example, are you inclined to figure out how a car engine works? Or how the TV works? Or how did they actually get that thing that caught your attention to work the way it does?
    Curiosity is many times the stuff that pushes students into engineering.

    I once read a very interesting article from Bob Pease ( a famous guru of electrical engineering), mentioning some kind of aptitude test people can take to figure out what partiular aptitudes a person is good at. This article is very interesting regarding figuring out what specific career choice one could take.
    I recommend you read this article. You can google "Robert Pease" and "aptitude testing".
    Good luck.
    Gabriella17
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    29 Feb 2012 02:42 PM
    Should you be mechanically inclined if you want to be a civil or environmental engineer? Those are the types I am most interested in.
    Niel
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    29 Feb 2012 04:18 PM
    Civil Engineering and its subset Environmental Engineering do not focus particularly on mechanical system. That is the purview of Mechanical Engineer and it subsets - Aeronautical, Robotics, Mechatronics, etc.

    You would be very well served if you went to several visitation days at a number of universities with strong Civil Engineering or Environment Engineering Departments / Schools. Talked the councilor and more importantly some of the alumni of those schools.

    Niel Leon
    engineering.com
    Gabriella17
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    12 Apr 2012 04:24 AM
    Thank you all for your answers. I will talk to previous civil engineering students.
    Gabriella17
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    12 Apr 2012 05:14 AM
    Another question: I've heard that electrical engineering is one of the hardest and most difficult engineering majors.
    Is that true? If it is, why is that?
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