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ordyh
hydraulic multiplication - 1 psi input force on 1 inch piston results 100 psi on 10 inch piston View All
what would the forces be in reverse? how much force would be required to pull the 10 inch piston with no input force on the inch piston?

6 years ago - 3 weeks left to answer. - 2 responses - Report Abuse
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Niel
This is not a simple question to answer. There are at least three variables -
1. The speed you are trying to move the 10 inch diameter piston
2. The viscosity of fluid involved
3. The size of the supply ports to both pistons

Niel Leon
engineering.com


6 years ago

Source:


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Bhisma
Firstly I think you have your units wrong, force is not measured in psi but in N (newton) or lbf (pound force). Considering this I think you really want to ask if in a system where I apply a 1 lbf on a piston (circular) of 1 inch dia. what will be the expected force output on a 10 dia piston? If so.....

Using pascals law the pressure developed in the input piston will be ;
P = F/A = 1 / (3.147*(1*1)*.25 ) = 1.27psi //// note the force is divided by the area of the circle

based on pascal law this pressure will be exerted on the other piston too,

P = F/A ; 1.27 = F/ (3.147*(10*10)*.25 )
F = 100lbf

Considering pressure losses the actual force may be lower.



6 years ago

Source: http://www.fluidpower.me/images/pascalcyl_qg2u.jpg


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