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ox4life598
How do you find Power (kW) output from a flow rate of steam (press. & temp. known) View All
I am working on a simulation problem in which I have the option to use "house water" to create High Pressured Steam (HPS), Medium Pressured Steam (MPS) and Low Pressured Steam (LPS) in three successive heat exchangers, respectively. Once done, the mass flow rates of each produced steam are available.

I want to use the steam to convert it to POWER (Kilowatts) and want to quantify the amount I can potentially send back to the grid.



6 years ago - 3 weeks left to answer. - 3 responses - Report Abuse
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Niel
You will need a set of steam tables or the enthalpy and entropy equations preferably in SI. Knowing the starting and ending conditions for the steam for the three systems you should be able to calculate the power available per kg of steam.

Niel Leon
engineering.com


6 years ago

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jatin1990
Let M' is masss flow rate in kg/sec and h1 and h2 are enthalpy at inlet and outlet of condensor in KJ/kg , subtract h2 from h1 to get delta h and then multiply that delta h (KJ/kg) with mass flow rate M' (kg/sec) , after multiplication you will find the units remaining are KJ/sec , which are units of power. So you got the power , but you will have to account some other factors which will decrease the power by some extent to get the actual value of power.
Best of luck.


6 years ago

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Bhisma
Using the pressure and temperature you would have to find the energy each stream has using the steam tables. If you do not know how to use the steam tables you will need to get help. If you are using the steam for power generation you will have to consider the inlet and outlet conditions of the turbine and the isentrophic efficiencies. Also the generator efficiencies will also have to be considered.

6 years ago

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