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aperol
There is a very annoying intermittent hum in my apartment. How do I find out where it is coming from? View All
The hum is deep in sound and variable in volume. It is loud enough to wake me from sleep, and prevent me from getting (back) to sleep
It appears to ‘bounce’ between the walls and windows in 2 particular rooms. It is less apparent in other rooms
It occurs at apparently random times, day and night – there appears to be no consistent action or event to set it off
Sometimes it lasts for minutes, other times it lasts for hours
It can disappear for days before reappearing
It ranges in its intensity and duration
It only occurs in my apartment – the neighbours below do not experience the same sound and no one else in the building has ever reported such a disturbance.

Apartment is on the top floor of 2. The roof is flat. There is a tv antenna on the roof directly above my apartment - this is my best guess as to the source. Noise appears generally during gentle breeze, but not during strong breeze or when completely still. Plumbing has been checked and ruled out.


5 years ago - 9 months left to answer. - 4 responses - Report Abuse
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Stan Kelly
It sounds like it could be wind related. Are there any guy wires supporting the antenna? They could be vibrating in the wind and you're hearing the sound through the anchors in the ceiling. If not, it could just be the antenna itself vibrating in the wind. It sounds like the antenna is a like source. If you can get to the roof, go up there next time you here the sound and check for any vibration on the antenna. Good Luck,
Stan


5 years ago

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pmac10
this may be 'mains hum' your experiencing, its basically the 50 or 60 Hz frequency of your electricity supply being picked up and amplified by mains operated electronic systems in your apartment, anything from an alarm clock to television, probably easier to check vibration from the tv antenna first though.
for more detailed info on mains hum and how to prevent it check
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mains_hum


5 years ago

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Mark Montgomery
You're apparently not alone: http://www.eng-tips.com/viewthread.cfm?qid=174011

5 years ago

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aperol
ASKED BY
More info from me...

Thanks for replies to date. Here's a little more info that may help:

The humming sound is completely random - it doesn't come on at a particular time, or when any particular plumbing or electrical device is being used.

The noise was audible before I moved into the apartment (but I didn't notice it til after I had signed the contract!). So I think that rules out any of my belongings (tv, stereo, alarm clock etc) being responsible.

I had some cosmetic (but no structural) renovations performed prior to moving in. This included plastering over some vents in the brick work. These were traditionally required in double-brick buildings for air circulation, but are no longer regulation (in Australia). In fact they just let in cold air (in winter) and noise. The vents inside the apartment were covered, while the vents on the outside were not. Could breeze be getting in the wall cavity and bouncing around? Am guessing this is unlikely.

My best guess is that it is related to the antenna. If it IS the guy-wires or the trunk of the antenna itself, how can the vibration be rectified?


5 years ago

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