In the past, we’ve shown you how designers are using 3D printing at the intersection of architecture and construction. Today, we’re going to show you something that is completely different.

Softkill Design, a group formed at the Architectural Association School of Architecture's Design Research Lab, have recently unveiled a project that envisions an architecture completely different from what most of us think of as architecture.

Dezeen interviewed one of the members of the team, Aaron Silver. In the interview, Aaron characterizes the difference between how his team viewed the use of 3D printing in the construction of their project.  

According to Aaron, “…the project is a 3D-printed cantilevering house, and really it is research based on distributing material along the lines of stress. We created an algorithm that mimics bone growth so really we are depositing material only where it is most necessary and most structurally efficient.”

Unlike other strategies, which would construct a massive printer onsite, the Softkill team envisioned their project being created in sections and transported to a site where each segment could be put together like a “three-dimensional puzzle.”

Softkill's strategy was to leverage the existing constraints of 3D printing, namely print space volume, to create an architecture that could be made today.

While there are many other innovations built into this project, the most fascinating to me is the team’s wish to create a project that could be realized now, and not when some far off revolution in 3D printing comes along. 

Get a glimpse into the architectures near future in the video below.

To read more about the ProtoHouse visit Dezeen


Softkill Algorithm from Sophia Tang on Vimeo.


 

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